Home Blog

How carbon capture technology can add to the emissions problem

0
How carbon capture technology can add to the emissions problem

Hello, Earthlings! This is our weekly newsletter on all things environmental, where we highlight trends and solutions that are moving us to a more sustainable world. (Sign up here to get it in your inbox every Thursday.)

This week:

  • How carbon capture technology can add to the emissions problem
  • The cities leading the charge on climate action
  • Can Wall Street help us find the true price of water?

How carbon capture technology can add to the emissions problem

(Darryl Dyck/The Canadian Press)

What On Earth27:01Can we really suck CO2 out of the air?

From trapping carbon dioxide at a plant, to removing it from the atmosphere, buzzworthy technology promises big. But will it deliver a pathway to a safer future, or delay getting off fossil fuels? 27:01

Carbon capture is often talked about as a climate solution, but a growing chorus of experts caution it may not be that effective, and in some cases could even add to greenhouse gas emissions.

“Direct air capture” promises to filter existing carbon dioxide out of the air, whereas “point-source capture” grabs carbon dioxide from smokestacks, ideally preventing emissions associated with things like steel, cement or power plants (like Saskatchewan’s coal-fired Boundary Dam project) from even reaching the atmosphere. 

But recent study of carbon capture processes casts doubt on their efficacy in reducing overall emissions. 

In fact, a lot of captured carbon is being repurposed to extract more oil and gas.

“People have heard about carbon capture, they have this sort of warm and fuzzy idea that … this can be something good to save us. And that’s because they have this impression that we can have carbon-neutral fossil fuels,” said June Sekera, a policy expert and visiting scholar at the New School in New York and senior research fellow at Boston University.

Sekera and a colleague reviewed 200 papers on the topic, including direct air capture and point-source capture. While captured carbon can be stored in a number of ways (including underground and in concrete), it is estimated up to 81 per cent is used in a process called enhanced oil recovery (EOR), a decades-old practice to extract remaining oil from an oil field.

The oil industry has touted this process as win-win — more efficient extraction and reduced emissions. Some research suggests that the EOR process could store about half of the carbon dioxide used to extract oil. But that means it still emits more CO2 than it captures. 

“A carbon removal process can be labelled as ‘net-negative’ when it removes more carbon dioxide than the emissions required to achieve that removal. But in the case of enhanced oil recovery, the extraction of oil is not in service of carbon removal,” said Andrew Bergman, a PhD student in applied physics at Harvard University who contributed to a new book on CO2 removal and is helping develop carbon removal technology.

“Talking about the ‘carbon content’ of oil extracted using enhanced oil recovery obscures the fact that [it’s] a process, very simply, for extracting oil,” said Bergman via email. “Oil itself cannot be net-negative. Oil is oil.”

Rather than assume we can replace other oil extraction with this particular method, Sekera said we should push for public policy measures to reduce the demand for oil. 

“We need energy,” she said. “We don’t need fossil fuels to be that source of energy.”

By extending the life of fossil fuels, Sekera worries it will delay the switch to renewable energy. It’s a concern shared by Dale Marshall, national program manager with the organization Environmental Defence. 

“Any time a government talks about fossil fuels being some kind of a bridge to a future sustainable world or a stepping stone to dealing with climate change, essentially what that means is we’re going to delay the phasing out of fossil fuels,” said Marshall.

Direct air capture technologies that filter carbon dioxide from the atmosphere have been demonstrated at a small scale — including ClimeWorks in Switzerland and Carbon Engineering in B.C. (see photo above). But they would require massive amounts of renewable energy in order to take more emissions out of the atmosphere than they emit.

Some suggest that while we need to quickly shift to renewable energy, we should also think about how carbon removal, like direct air capture, could fit into the larger emissions-reduction picture. 

“Fossil fuel companies [being] involved in carbon removal is controversial,” said Shuchi Talati, a senior policy advisor with Carbon 180, a D.C.-based NGO. While she acknowledged that this sort of technology may be important in the interim, she said “the public should benefit from [carbon capture] technology.”

Talati said regulation and transparency of carbon capture would allow governments to procure carbon storage as a public service.

“In my ideal future, none of this carbon would be going towards enhancing the [oil] recovery,” she said. “It would be stored underground. And that’s really how you benefit from that captured carbon — when you permanently lock it away, whether it’s underground or in materials like concrete. I think using it for [oil] recovery is not a way that the public can profit from those actions.”

Molly Segal

Reader feedback

Last week, Emily Chung wrote about some emerging eco-friendly consumer trends, including decreased meat consumption and increased active transport (like walking and cycling).

A reader named Urbano had this to say:

“Thank you for the article about green habits on the rise. May I also suggest you write one on the rise of groups such as the Buy Nothing Project. My neighbourhood Buy Nothing group has grown so much we recently had to split into several smaller groups. 

“During the time I’ve belonged, I’ve seen food and tool sharing, people getting together to help neighbours in need furnish their apartments with items they no longer have need of and many smaller acts of sharing, such as passing on clothes no longer worn or household items they never use. In addition to building community, this means hundreds of items — even food — are not ending up in the waste stream.”

In response to an item in the last newsletter about plastic pollution at a Serbian hydro-power plant, Debra Hayes said, “When I look at photos like those taken of the plastic-clogged Serbian dam, I think we are the plague and COVID is here to save the Earth from us.”

Old issues of What on Earth? are right here.

There’s also a radio show! This week, What on Earth asks: Does sucking CO2 out of the air live up to the promise? From capturing carbon at industrial plants to filtering it from the air, join host Laura Lynch for a look at what it all means and if it is a viable part of our climate future. Listen to What on Earth on CBC Radio One on Sunday at 12:30 p.m., 1 p.m. in Newfoundland, or any time on podcast or CBC Listen.


The Big Picture: Cities leading the charge on climate action

Reducing carbon emissions and addressing the ancillary impacts of climate change are monumental tasks that require co-operation across jurisdictional boundaries. Let’s face it — that often doesn’t happen. Governments at the national level have the money and legislative sway to address many environmental challenges, but they don’t always demonstrate the will, which is why lower levels of government often feel compelled to act. Cities are hubs of social, economic and environmental activity, which is why several years ago, a number of them banded together to form C40, “a network of the world’s megacities committed to addressing climate change” (their words). The list includes places like Paris, New York, Shanghai and Addis Ababa — as well as Montreal, Toronto and Vancouver. C40 cities have taken bold steps on initiatives like renewable energy, reducing building emissions and phasing out plastics — always with an eye on sharing knowledge.

(CBC)

Hot and bothered: Provocative ideas from around the web


Can Wall Street help us find the true price of water?

(Carlos Osorio/Reuters)

CBC News business columnist Don Pittis wrote about the broader implications of the introduction of water futures.

You could be forgiven if, amid the recent chaos of COVID-19 and U.S. politics, you missed some news related to what is arguably Canada’s most valuable natural resource.

Just before Christmas, the CME Group, the New York-based market operator that takes its name from the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, began trading water futures. For the first time, Wall Street traders are now able to take a stake in the future value of water the way they have with other agricultural and mineral commodities.

As with gold or pork bellies or natural gas, commodities speculators may see it as a kind of sophisticated gambling on derivatives. But the intent of the new water futures market is to share the risk of unexpected price swings for farmers and other water users.

While traded in North America’s financial capital, so far the water contracts being bought and sold are limited to five water districts in drought-prone California. But it could expand well beyond the Golden State.

“Climate change, droughts, population growth and pollution are likely to make water scarcity issues and pricing a hot topic for years to come,” RBC Capital Markets managing director Deane Dray told Bloomberg Green.

Water remains big business. But the idea of the wet stuff as something to be bought and sold by Wall Street speculators does not necessarily sit well with those who study the economics of this resource in Canada.

“I find it quite disturbing,” said Jim Warren, a Regina-based scholar and author of Defying Palliser: Stories of Resilience from the Driest Region of the Canadian Prairies.

Water has always been seen by economists as a special case. Like the air we breathe, it is more valuable to human life than gold or oil or even, in the short term, food. But because of its relative abundance, water’s traditional price in Canada has been close to zero.

In the driest parts of Alberta and Saskatchewan, Warren said there are signs that may be changing. He points to events around the year 2000, when Alberta and Saskatchewan were suffering a serious drought and communities and their industrial users were running out of water in the Lethbridge area.

Warren said that under an implied threat from the provincial government, and for a financial consideration, irrigation associations of farmers who had allocations of water cut back on their use by about a third. Elsewhere, individual farmers who had allocations of their own made private deals with neighbours to share some of their water.

“It wasn’t as if there were public auctions,” said Warren. “At the curling rinks and coffee shops, you sort of figured out what it might be worth to sell some of what [you] had to others.”

The situation demonstrated how water was already being commodified.

As a provincial resource under the Constitution, there is no single set of rules for water use in Canada. However, the general rule is that water cannot be bought or owned. Instead, it is allocated by provincial regulation.

Diane Dupont, a water economist at Brock University in St. Catharines, Ont., said in most cases, the water itself costs nothing for municipal and large industrial users — and that creates problems of its own.

“Typically, they’re paying a very low fee,” said Dupont, author of Running Through Our Fingers: How Canada Fails to Capture the Value of its Top Asset. “They’re not paying the value of the water.”

Despite the apparent abundance of water in Canada, she said, low prices mean the best-quality water in many regions is in increasingly short supply and being overused.

Roy Brouwer, executive director of the Water Institute at the University of Waterloo, said that introducing various market price systems might fix that.

Of course, in the past, leaving speculators in charge of the price of essential goods — such as when Enron helped bid up the price of gas and electricity in the early 2000s — has sometimes worked out badly for end users.

“If you leave it completely to the market, you might end up with some of these extreme situations,” said Brouwer. “Somewhere in between considering water a human right and the commodification of water through these water markets is probably where you want to be.”

Don Pittis


Stay in touch!

Are there issues you’d like us to cover? Questions you want answered? Do you just want to share a kind word? We’d love to hear from you. Email us at [email protected].

Sign up here to get What on Earth? in your inbox every Thursday.

Editor: Andre Mayer | Logo design: Sködt McNalty

Source link

Can Trump pardon himself? Would the courts reject the move?

0
Can Trump pardon himself? Would the courts reject the move?

As he prepares to end a tumultuous four years as U.S. president facing potential legal jeopardy, Donald
Trump has discussed the possibility of pardoning himself, according to a source familiar with the matter. But there are questions about whether a president’s broad executive clemency powers under the U.S. Constitution would permit such action.

The Justice Department has previously taken the view that the Constitution does not allow a sitting president to be indicted, but a former president enjoys no such protections.

Here is an explanation of the potential constitutional problems with a self-
pardon and why such action would not end
Trump‘s legal jeopardy after his term ends on Wednesday.

Is a self-pardon constitutional?

There is no definitive answer to this question, and the Constitution does not explicitly address this possibility. No president has tried it before, so the courts have not weighed in.
Trump wrote on Twitter in 2018 that he had the “absolute right” to
pardon himself. A White House spokesman declined to comment on the possibility of a self-
pardon.

Many scholars have said a self-
pardon would be unconstitutional because it violates the basic principle that nobody should be the judge in his or her own case.

Others have argued that a self-
pardon is constitutional because the
pardon power is very broadly worded in the Constitution. Historical texts made clear that the nation’s 18th century founders discussed self-pardons, but opted not to include an explicit limitation on that power.

The Constitution states that a president “shall have power to grant reprieves and pardons for offenses against the United States, except in cases of impeachment.” The common usage and history of the words “grant” and ”
pardon” imply a president’s power under the clause is limited to issuing pardons to other people, according to University of Missouri law professor Frank Bowman.

The last time the Justice Department explored the question was in a 1974 memo by a lawyer in its Office of Legal Counsel that concluded that it would be unconstitutional for then-President Richard Nixon to
pardon himself. Nixon resigned that year amid the Watergate political scandal.

“Under the fundamental rule that no one may be a judge in his own case, the President cannot
pardon himself,” the Justice Department lawyer wrote.

But the memo argued that Nixon could temporarily step down, be pardoned by his then-vice president, and then resume power. The 1974 memo does not have any legal authority.

Presidential pardons apply only to federal crimes, not state crimes.


How might a self-pardon be tested in court?


Under U.S. law, courts do not issue advisory opinions. For a court to rule on a self-
pardon‘s validity, the Justice Department would need to charge
Trump with a crime, and then he would need to invoke the
pardon as a defense, legal experts said.

A self-
pardon might only embolden prosecutors to bring a case against
Trump because it would suggest he is hiding something, said law professor Jessica Levinson of Loyola Law School in California.


Why would Trump pardon himself?


He may face criminal liability on several fronts.

Some legal experts have pointed to
Trump‘s Jan. 2 phone call in which he pressured Georgia’s top election official to “find” enough votes to overturn his Nov. 3 election loss to President-elect Joe Biden in the state. They said the call could have violated a federal and a state law.

A Georgia law against “criminal solicitation to commit election fraud” makes it illegal for a person to intentionally solicit, request, command or otherwise attempt to cause another person to engage in election fraud. A separate federal law makes it illegal to attempt to “deprive or defraud” people of a “fair and impartially conducted election process.”

Trump would likely argue that he merely expressed his personal opinions to the official, and did not order him to interfere with the election.

Some lawyers have said
Trump could be in legal jeopardy for an incendiary speech he gave to thousands of supporters on Jan. 6, shortly before a mob descended on the U.S. Capitol and disrupted congressional certification of Biden’s victory, sending lawmakers into hiding and leaving five people dead.
Trump could make a strong case that his remarks were protected by the Constitution’s guarantee of free speech, other lawyers said.

Trump could be targeted by prosecutors for violations of state laws. Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus Vance already is spearheading a tax-fraud investigation into
Trump‘s businesses, though no charges have yet been brought.
Trump has called the investigation politically motivated.


How broadly could a self-pardon be worded?


There is precedent for very broadly worded pardons. Nixon eventually received a “full and unconditional
pardon” from his successor, Gerald Ford. The
pardon cleared Nixon for “any crimes that he might have committed against the United States as president.”

The U.S. Supreme Court has never ruled on whether such a broad
pardon is lawful. Some scholars have argued that the nation’s founders intended for pardons to be specific, and that there is an implied limit on their scope.


Could a pardon be preemptive?


A
pardon cannot cover future conduct, but a
pardon can be preemptive in the sense that it can cover conduct that has not yet resulted in legal proceedings.

The Nixon
pardon is an example, and there are others. In 1977, President Jimmy Carter preemptively pardoned hundreds of thousands of “draft dodgers” who avoided a government-imposed obligation to serve in the Vietnam War.



Source link

Pay and skip quarantine: Cops bust scam at Mumbai airport | India News

0
Pay and skip quarantine: Cops bust scam at Mumbai airport | India News

MUMBAI: Police on Friday arrested a 35-year-old sub-engineer and two accomplices in Mumbai’s Sahar for their alleged role in collecting Rs 4,000 from each flyer arriving at Chhatrapati Shivaji International Airport (CSIA) who wanted to skip mandatory institutional quarantine.
Police seized Rs 1.4 lakh cash, 200 Saudi riyals, a fake rubber stamp of home quarantine, few letterheads with stamp and signatures of doctors from some top private hospitals in the bag of Dinesh Gawande (35), who was posted by BMC at the airport since December 23 and had to check flyers from Dubai, Kuwait and US at P6 on Friday.
Police are probing if officials helped Gawande to get the bribes and the number of flyers he cleared with fake documents. If found guilty he can be imprisoned for seven years.
Gawande’s luck ran short when he barged into a toilet and returned with a bag after pushing aside a lady from the housekeeping staff who was walking in around 5.50am. “The woman complained to CISF and MIAL officials after she suspected Gawande, who claimed he was helped by Ashraf Sarang (41) and Vivek Singh (32) from the airport’s duty-free shop in making fake health certificates. The trio was booked under IPC sections for violation of prohibitory orders, cheating, forgery, counterfeiting a mark used by a public servant and under Epidemic and Disaster Act. They are in police custody till January 19,” a Sahar police officer said.
Officials, on a tip-off from the woman, checked Gawande’s bag and found a huge amount of cash along with fake documents like a fake home quarantine rubber stamp, fake signatures and stamp of doctors on four letterheads of Tata Memorial Hospital, three letterheads of Asian Heart Institute and two of a doctor of Care Medical Centre. “Gawande admitted he was collecting bribes. His bank account will be checked. He shared the money with Sarang and Singh,” said a police officer.
Singh’s lawyers Prabhakar Tripathi and Saurabh Mishra requested the court for judicial custody as the accused did not have any role in the case and he went with his team leader to assist him.
Police recorded statements of flyers Khan Javid Nawab from Andheri (W), Shaikh Shakeel Salim and Khan Arbaz Sattar from Malad (W), Harie Rio John from Nerul (E) and Shaikh Shakir Sakur from Nashik, who flew from Dubai and Kuwait, and said Gawande collected Rs4000 from them.

Source link

Stricter framework for banks, NBFCs on anvil: RBI Guv Shaktikanta Das – The Economic Times Video

0
Stricter framework for banks, NBFCs on anvil: RBI Guv Shaktikanta Das – The Economic Times Video

Reserve Bank of India (RBI) Governor Shaktikanta Das on Saturday said the central bank seeks to tweak regulatory framework in order to strengthen governance in banks and non-banking financial institutions (NBFCs). These measures are in the pipeline and will be announced over the next few weeks, he added.



Source link

Gilles, Poirier lead after rhythm dance at virtual Skate Canada Challenge

0
Gilles, Poirier lead after rhythm dance at virtual Skate Canada Challenge

Piper Gilles and Paul Poirier are the leaders after the rhythm dance of the unique and virtual Skate Canada Challenge.

The reigning Canadian champions scored 87.96 points.

Laurence Fournier-Beaudry and Nikolaj Sorensen are second (86.55), while Marjorie Lajoie and Zachary Lagha scored 81.58 to sit third.

Because of rising COVID-19 cases in Canada, the Challenge was held virtually. Skaters submitted videos of their programs that were shot at their home rinks over the past few weeks. To simulate a live show, the programs were broadcast — and judged in real time — on Saturday.

No fans were permitted in the rinks, just the skaters, their coaches, a video crew, and a Skate Canada official who was there to ensure competition rules were followed.

The makeshift competition is the only event Canadians skaters have had this season. Skate Canada recently announced the cancellation of next month’s Canadian championships in Vancouver. That event would have determined the team for the world championships in March in Stockholm. Whether or not the world championships will happen is questionable.

Last year’s world championships in March were one of the first international sports event cancelled due to the pandemic. Skate Canada International in October was also cancelled.

The U.S. national championships, meanwhile, are happening this weekend in Las Vegas.

The women’s free program was scheduled for later Saturday, while the men’s free is Sunday.

Kirsten Moore-Towers and Michael Marinaro won the pairs competition last weekend.

Source link

Uganda says president wins sixth term as vote-rigging alleged

0
Uganda says president wins sixth term as vote-rigging alleged

Uganda’s electoral commission said Saturday that President Yoweri Museveni won a sixth five-year term, extending his rule to four decades, while top opposition challenger Bobi Wine dismissed “cooked-up, fraudulent results” and officials struggled to explain how polling results were compiled amid an internet blackout.

In a generational clash watched across the African continent with a booming young population and a host of aging leaders, the 38-year-old singer-turned-lawmaker Wine posed arguably Museveni’s greatest challenge yet. The self-described “ghetto president” had strong support in urban centers where frustration with unemployment and corruption is high. He has claimed victory.

In a phone interview from his home, which he said was surrounded by soldiers who wouldn’t let him leave, Wine urged the international community to “please call Gen. Museveni to order” by withholding aid, imposing sanctions and using Magnitsky legislation to hold alleged human rights users accountable.

Supporters of Ugandan President Yoweri Kaguta Museveni celebrate in Kampala, Uganda, Saturday Jan. 16, 2021, after their candidate was declared winner of the presidential elections. Uganda’s electoral commission says longtime President Yoweri Museveni has won a sixth term, while top opposition challenger Bobi Wine alleges rigging and officials struggle to explain how polling results were compiled amid an internet blackout. In a generational clash widely watched across the African continent, the young singer-turned-lawmaker Wine posed arguably the greatest challenge yet to Museveni. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)

Supporters of Ugandan President Yoweri Kaguta Museveni celebrate in Kampala, Uganda, Saturday Jan. 16, 2021, after their candidate was declared winner of the presidential elections. Uganda’s electoral commission says longtime President Yoweri Museveni has won a sixth term, while top opposition challenger Bobi Wine alleges rigging and officials struggle to explain how polling results were compiled amid an internet blackout. In a generational clash widely watched across the African continent, the young singer-turned-lawmaker Wine posed arguably the greatest challenge yet to Museveni. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)

Wine repeated that all legal options are being considered, including challenging the results in court and calling for peaceful protests.

The electoral commission said Museveni received 58% of ballots and Wine 34%, and voter turnout was 52%, in a process that the top United States diplomat to Africa called “fundamentally flawed.”

TWITTER CALLS FOR ‘OPEN INTERNET,’ ‘ACCESS TO INFORMATION’ DURING ELECTION IN UGANDA

The commission advised people celebrating to remember COVID-19 precautions, but reaction in the capital, Kampala, was muted. At one point, hundreds of Museveni supporters on motorcycles sped by, honking and chanting. The military remained in the streets.

AP journalists who tried to reach Wine’s home on Kampala’s outskirts were turned away by police. Wine has said he is alone with his wife, Barbie, and a single security guard after police told a private security company to withdraw its protection ahead of Thursday’s election.

Supporter of Ugandan President Yoweri Kaguta Museveni celebrate, in Kampala, Uganda, Saturday Jan. 16, 2021, after their candidate was declared winner of the presidential elections. Uganda’s electoral commission says longtime President Yoweri Museveni has won a sixth term, while top opposition challenger Bobi Wine alleges rigging and officials struggle to explain how polling results were compiled amid an internet blackout. In a generational clash widely watched across the African continent, the young singer-turned-lawmaker Wine posed arguably the greatest challenge yet to Museveni. (AP Photo/Nicholas Bamulanzeki)

Supporter of Ugandan President Yoweri Kaguta Museveni celebrate, in Kampala, Uganda, Saturday Jan. 16, 2021, after their candidate was declared winner of the presidential elections. Uganda’s electoral commission says longtime President Yoweri Museveni has won a sixth term, while top opposition challenger Bobi Wine alleges rigging and officials struggle to explain how polling results were compiled amid an internet blackout. In a generational clash widely watched across the African continent, the young singer-turned-lawmaker Wine posed arguably the greatest challenge yet to Museveni. (AP Photo/Nicholas Bamulanzeki)

“I’m alive,” Wine said. After declaring “the world is watching” on the eve of the vote, he said “I don’t know what will happen to me and my wife” now. He said he won’t leave Uganda and abandon its 45 million people to the kind of treatment he has faced.

The vote followed the East African country’s worst pre-election violence since the 76-year-old Museveni took office in 1986. Wine and other candidates were beaten or harassed, and more than 50 people were killed when security forces put down riots in November over his arrest. Wine, whose real name is Kyagulanyi Ssentamu, was detained several times while campaigning but never convicted. He said he feared for his life.

GLENN GREENWALD BLASTS ‘DANGEROUS IRONY’ OF TWITTER WARNING UGANDANS OF CENSORSHIP AHEAD OF ELECTIONS

This month, Wine petitioned the International Criminal Court over alleged torture and other abuses by security forces and named several officials including Museveni.

In response to his allegations of vote-rigging, Uganda’s electoral commission said Wine should prove it. Wine says he has video evidence and will share it once internet access is restored.

Supporters of Ugandan President Yoweri Kaguta Museveni celebrate, in Kampala, Uganda, Saturday Jan. 16, 2021, after their candidate was declared winner of the presidential elections. Uganda’s electoral commission says longtime President Yoweri Museveni has won a sixth term, while top opposition challenger Bobi Wine alleges rigging and officials struggle to explain how polling results were compiled amid an internet blackout. In a generational clash widely watched across the African continent, the young singer-turned-lawmaker Wine posed arguably the greatest challenge yet to Museveni. (AP Photo/Nicholas Bamulanzeki)

Supporters of Ugandan President Yoweri Kaguta Museveni celebrate, in Kampala, Uganda, Saturday Jan. 16, 2021, after their candidate was declared winner of the presidential elections. Uganda’s electoral commission says longtime President Yoweri Museveni has won a sixth term, while top opposition challenger Bobi Wine alleges rigging and officials struggle to explain how polling results were compiled amid an internet blackout. In a generational clash widely watched across the African continent, the young singer-turned-lawmaker Wine posed arguably the greatest challenge yet to Museveni. (AP Photo/Nicholas Bamulanzeki)

Museveni said in a national address that “I think this may turn out to be the most cheating-free election since 1962,” or independence from Britain.

The electoral commission deflected questions about how countrywide voting results were transmitted during the internet blackout by saying “we designed our own system.”

HAUNTING PHOTO SHOWS MAN MOMENTS BEFORE PLUNGING 350 FEET TO HIS DEATH IN ZIMBABWE

“We did not receive any orders from above during this election,” commission chair Simon Byabakama told reporters, adding his team was “neither intimidated nor threatened.”

While the president holds on to power, at least nine of his Cabinet ministers, including the vice president, were voted out in parliamentary elections, many losing to candidates from Wine’s party, local media reported.

Supporters of Ugandan President Yoweri Kaguta Museveni celebrate in Kampala, Uganda, Saturday Jan. 16, 2021, after their candidate was declared winner of the presidential elections. Uganda’s electoral commission says longtime President Yoweri Museveni has won a sixth term, while top opposition challenger Bobi Wine alleges rigging and officials struggle to explain how polling results were compiled amid an internet blackout. In a generational clash widely watched across the African continent, the young singer-turned-lawmaker Wine posed arguably the greatest challenge yet to Museveni. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)

Supporters of Ugandan President Yoweri Kaguta Museveni celebrate in Kampala, Uganda, Saturday Jan. 16, 2021, after their candidate was declared winner of the presidential elections. Uganda’s electoral commission says longtime President Yoweri Museveni has won a sixth term, while top opposition challenger Bobi Wine alleges rigging and officials struggle to explain how polling results were compiled amid an internet blackout. In a generational clash widely watched across the African continent, the young singer-turned-lawmaker Wine posed arguably the greatest challenge yet to Museveni. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)

Tracking the vote was further complicated by the arrests of independent monitors and the denial of accreditation to most members of the U.S. observer mission, leading the U.S. to call it off. The European Union said its offer to deploy electoral experts “was not taken up.”

“Uganda’s electoral process has been fundamentally flawed,” the top U.S. diplomat for Africa, Tibor Nagy, tweeted, warning that “the U.S. response hinges on what the Ugandan government does now.”

25,000 NATIONAL GUARD TROOPS DEPLOYED TO CAPITOL AS BIDEN INAUGURATION LOOMS

Museveni, once praised as part of a new generation of African leaders and a longtime U.S. security ally, still has support in Uganda for bringing stability. He once criticized African leaders who refused to step aside but has since overseen the removal of term limits and an age limit on the presidency.

He alleged repeatedly that foreign groups were trying to meddle in this election, without providing evidence. He accused Wine of being “an agent of foreign interests.” Wine denies it.

The head of the African Union observer team, Samuel Azuu Fonkam, told reporters he could not say whether the election was free and fair, noting the “limited” mission which largely focused on Kampala. Asked about Wine’s allegations of rigging, he said he could not “speak about things we did not see or observe.”

The East African Community observer team noted “disproportionate use of force in some instances” by security forces, the internet shutdown, some late-opening polling stations and isolated cases of failure in biometric kits to verify voters. But it called the vote largely peaceful and said it “demonstrated the level of maturity expected of a democracy.”

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Uganda’s elections are often marred by allegations of fraud and abuses by security forces.

Source link

Teenage actor Archie Lyndhurst’s cause of death revealed

0
Teenage actor Archie Lyndhurst’s cause of death revealed

Actor Archie Lyndhurst‘s cause of death has been revealed by his family.

The “So Awkward” star, who died at the age of 19 in September, suffered a brain hemmorhage. His mother, Lucy Lyndhurst, revealed the details a doctor shared with her and the late star’s father in a lengthy Instagram post Friday.

“He died from an Intracerebral Haemorrhage caused by Acute Lymphoblastic Lymphoma/Leukaemia. This is not Leukaemia as we know it, the word Acute in medical terms means rapid,” Lucy shared.

The mourning mother said the doctor “assured us that there wasn’t anything anyone could have done as Archie showed no signs of illness.” The doctor informed the parents that the actor had “numerous bleeds on the brain.”

MARVEL’S ANTHONY MACKIE ON NETFLIX MOVIE STARRING THE LATE CHADWICK BOSEMAN: ‘TOO EMOTIONAL’ TO WATCH

Actor Archie Lyndhurst, known for his role on the Children's British Broadcasting Corporation (CBBC) show "So Awkward," died in September at age 19.

Actor Archie Lyndhurst, known for his role on the Children’s British Broadcasting Corporation (CBBC) show “So Awkward,” died in September at age 19.
(Joe Maher/FilmMagic)

“The results utterly floored us to think something like this could happen. It’s very rare and around only 800 people a year die from it,” Lucy continued.

Archie’s father is Nicholas Lyndhurst from the British sitcom “Goodnight Sweetheart.”

Lucy’s Instagram post featured a number of photos of her late son throughout his life, including a touching photo of him and his father laughing, as well as more recent ones in which he poses in front of a colorful graffiti wall and embraces his girlfriend.

CLICK HERE TO SIGN UP FOR OUR ENTERTAINMENT NEWSLETTER

Archie’s mother went on to pay tribute to her son, letting her followers know that he “was and always will remain our everything.”

“We are still learning each day the incredible impact he had on others lives, the kindness and generousity he showed them. He was an old soul and incredibly advanced for his years in many ways. As his parents we couldn’t be prouder of him for all he achieved in the short time he was given,and especially for the beautiful human being he was,” the mother continues in her caption.

The Children’s British Broadcasting Corporation (CBBC) which aired “So Awkward,” previously confirmed his passing.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

“We’re so sorry to have to tell you that Archie Lyndhurst, who so brilliantly played Ollie in So Awkward on CBBC, has very sadly died after a short illness. Archie will be hugely missed by all who worked with him, and by all the fans who laughed along with Ollie in the show,” the network said in a statement.

Archie’s previous work included voice work for the video game “Final Fantasy XIV: Heavensward” and he played the younger version of Jack Whitehall on the BBC comedy “Bad Education.”



Source link

U.S. state capitol buildings beef up security amid fears of armed pro-Trump protests

0
U.S. state capitol buildings beef up security amid fears of armed pro-Trump protests

Washington, D.C., was locked down and U.S. law enforcement officials geared up for pro-Trump marches in all 50 state capitals this weekend, erecting barriers and deploying thousands of National Guard troops to try to prevent the kind of violent attack that rattled the nation on Jan. 6.

The FBI warned police agencies of possible armed protests outside all 50 state capitol buildings starting Saturday through president-elect Joe Biden’s inauguration on Wednesday, fuelled by supporters of President Donald Trump who believe his false claims of electoral fraud.

Michigan, Virginia, Wisconsin, Pennsylvania and Washington were among states that activated their National Guards to strengthen security. Texas closed its Capitol building through Inauguration Day.

Steve McCraw, director of the Texas Department of Public Safety, said in a statement late Friday that intelligence indicated “violent extremists” may seek to exploit planned armed protests in Austin to “conduct criminal acts.”

The scramble followed the deadly Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol in Washington by a mix of extremists and Trump supporters, some of whom planned to kidnap members of Congress and called for the death of Vice-President Mike Pence as he presided over the certification of Biden’s victory in November’s election.

WATCH | U.S. National Guard activated in Michigan:

Mayor Andy Schor of Lansing, Mich., says security preparations ahead of inauguration day are in place to prevent violent protests against the presidential election results. 7:15

Law enforcement officials have trained much of their focus on Sunday, when the anti-government “boogaloo” movement flagged plans to hold rallies in all 50 states.

In Michigan, a fence was erected around the Capitol in Lansing, and troopers were mobilized from across the state to bolster security. The legislature cancelled meetings next week, citing concern over credible threats.

“We are prepared for the worst, but we remain hopeful that those who choose to demonstrate at our Capitol do so peacefully,” Michigan State Police Director Joe Gasper told a news conference on Friday.

Washington on high alert

Thousands of armed National Guard troops were in the streets in Washington in an unprecedented show of force after the assault on the U.S. Capitol. Bridges into the city were to be closed, along with dozens of roadways. The National Mall and other iconic U.S. landmarks were blocked off into next week.

On Saturday, police arrested a man with a handgun and 500 rounds of ammunition at a checkpoint near the U.S. Capitol.

Court documents say Wesley Allen Beeler approached the checkpoint but did not have a valid credential for that area. An officer noticed he had “firearms-related stickers” on his vehicle and asked him if he had any weapons inside.

Members of the U.S. National Guard secure the area near the Capitol building in Washington, D.C., on Saturday. (Eduardo Munoz/Reuters)

The documents say Beeler told the officers he had a handgun under the armrest, and police detained him at the scene. They searched his car and found a high-capacity magazine in the 9mm handgun, along with more than 500 rounds of ammunition in the vehicle. Authorities said he didn’t have a licence to carry the gun in Washington.

Beeler was charged with carrying a pistol without a licence. His lawyer did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Experts say battleground states most at risk

The perception that the Jan. 6 insurrection was a success could embolden domestic extremists motivated by anti-government, racial and partisan grievances, spurring them to further violence, according to a government intelligence bulletin dated Wednesday that was first reported by Yahoo News.

The Joint Intelligence Bulletin, produced by the FBI, Department of Homeland Security and National Counterterrorism Center, further warned that “false narratives” about electoral fraud would serve as an ongoing catalyst for extremist groups.

Experts say that the capitals of battleground states such as Wisconsin, Michigan, Pennsylvania and Arizona are among those most at risk of violence. But even states not seen as likely flashpoints are taking precautions.

Illinois Gov. J.B. Pritzker said on Friday that while his state had not received any specific threats, he was beefing up security around the Capitol in Springfield, including adding about 250 state National Guard troops.

The alarm extended beyond legislatures. The United Church of Christ, a Protestant denomination of more than 4,900 churches, warned its 800,000 members there were reports that “liberal” churches could be attacked in the coming week.

WATCH | U.S. overcompensating with inauguration security, expert says:

The huge security rollout in Washington, D.C., ahead of the presidential inauguration on Jan. 20 is because there is not a good grasp of intelligence, says security expert Christian Leuprecht, and officials don’t want a repeat of the Capitol security breach on Jan. 6. 5:33

Suzanne Spaulding, a former undersecretary for the Department of Homeland Security, said disclosing enhanced security measures can be an effective deterrent.

“One of the ways you can potentially de-escalate a problem is with a strong security posture,” said Spaulding, now a senior adviser at the Center for Strategic and International Studies. “You try to deter people from trying anything.”

Following the Jan. 6 violence in Washington, some militia members said they would not attend a long-planned pro-gun demonstration in Virginia on Monday, which is Martin Luther King Jr. Day, a federal holiday. Authorities in Virginia were worried about the risk of violence as multiple groups converged on the state capital, Richmond.

WATCH | More details emerge about mobs that attacked the U.S. Capitol:

Washington increases security to prepare for potential violence leading up to Joe Biden’s inauguration, while more ugly details emerge about the white nationalist mobs that rampaged Capitol Hill last week. 2:43

Others told the Washington Post that they wanted the protest organized in response to new state gun rules to be peaceful. Some militias in other parts of the country have told followers to stay home this weekend, citing the increased security or the risk that the planned events were law enforcement traps.

Even so, Michael Hayden of the Southern Poverty Law Center said he has not been this worried about the potential for violence in a long time. Among other factors, he said the perceived censorship of conservative voices by technology companies such as Twitter has served to meld right-wing extremists and run-of-the-mill Republicans into a common cause.

“It has provided a kind of unifying grievance between groups that had no connection with one another before,” Hayden said.

Source link

GM, Unifor reach tentative deal to build electric delivery vans in Ontario

0
GM, Unifor reach tentative deal to build electric delivery vans in Ontario

GM Canada says it has reached a tentative deal with Unifor that, if ratified, will see it invest $1 billion to transform its CAMI plant in Ingersoll, Ont., to make commercial electric vehicles.

Unifor national president Jerry Dias said along with the significant investment, the agreement between the company and union will mean new products, new jobs and job security for workers.

In a statement, Dias said that more details of the tentative deal will be presented to Unifor Local 88 members at an online ratification meeting scheduled for Sunday.

He said the results of the ratification vote are scheduled to be released on Monday.

Details of the agreement were not released Friday night, but the Ontario government issued a statement on Saturday praising the deal as “good news.”

“Unifor and General Motors have worked together to reach a tentative deal that will further strengthen Ontario’s world-class auto sector for its workers, their families and the communities they live in,” a joint statement from Premier Doug Ford and Economic Development Minister Vic Fedeli said.

FedEx lined up to buy electric delivery vans

A GM spokesperson said in a statement that the plan is to build BrightDrop EV 600s — an all-new GM business announced this week at the Consumer Electronics Show that will offer a cleaner way for delivery and logistics companies to move goods more efficiently. The growth of online shopping has increased demand for electric vans.

BrightDrop’s first customer is FedEx, which will begin receiving GM’s EV600 electric vans later this year.

The Ingersoll plant currently makes Chevrolet Equinox SUVs.

Unifor said the contract would bring total investment negotiated by the union to nearly $6 billion after new agreements were ratified with General Motors, Ford and Fiat Chrysler in 2020 that included support from the federal and Ontario governments.

It said the Ford deal reached in September included $1.95 billion to bring battery electric vehicle production to Oakville, Ont., and a new engine derivative to Windsor, Ont., while the Fiat Chrysler agreement included more than $1.5 billion to build plug-in hybrid vehicles and battery electric vehicles.

Unifor said in November that General Motors agreed to a $1.3 billion investment to bring 1,700 jobs to Oshawa, Ont., plus more than $109 million to insource new transmission work for the Corvette and support continued V8 engine production in St. Catharines, Ont.

Source link

Nestle recalls 762,000 pounds of pepperoni Hot Pockets

0
Nestle recalls 762,000 pounds of pepperoni Hot Pockets

Mount Sterling: Nestle Prepared Foods is recalling more than 762,000 pounds of pepperoni Hot Pockets, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service said. T

he frozen stuffed sandwiches – shipped to retail stores nationwide – are being recalled because they “may be contaminated with extraneous materials, specifically pieces of glass and hard plastic,” the USDA said Friday.

The problem was discovered when the company received four consumer complaints of extraneous material in pepperoni Hot Pockets, the department said. The company has received one report of a “minor oral injury” associated with consumption of the product, the USDA said.

The recall is for 54-ounce packages containing 12 “Nestle Hot Pockets Brand Sandwiches: Premium Pepperoni made with pork, chicken and beef pizza garlic buttery crust.” Affected boxes have a “Best before Feb 2022” date and lot codes of 0318544624, 0319544614, 0320544614 and 0321544614, the department said.

The boxes also have the establishment number “EST. 7721A” inside the USDA mark of inspection.

“Consumers who have purchased this product are urged not to consume it,” the USDA said. “This product should be thrown away or returned to the place of purchase.”



Source link

site-verification: 6e99d3b8b713114ea57b2b34d4f43418